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How Should Restaurants Pay Their Servers? Well, Its Complicated – NPR

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https://www.npr.org/2021/03/20/977958521/so-how-should-your-favorite-restaurant-pay-its-servers-well-its-complicated

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Chef Yia Vang’s restaurant in Minneapolis is getting ready to open amid a fierce debate within the restaurant industry about the minimum wage. The restaurant will ban tipping.

Lauren Cutshall


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Lauren Cutshall

Chef Yia Vang’s restaurant in Minneapolis is getting ready to open amid a fierce debate within the restaurant industry about the minimum wage. The restaurant will ban tipping.

Lauren Cutshall

Jillian Melton and Paul Sklar work at two restaurants hundreds of miles apart. And when it comes to the $15 minimum wage debate, their differences in views could almost be as vast.

The push by Democrats to raise the federal minimum wage would also eliminate a decades-long practice of paying restaurant servers as little as $2.13 an hour under the expectation they would earn far more through tips.

It is a pay structure prevalent in most states, including in Tennessee, where Melton was a server at the chain restaurant Seasons 52 until she was laid off during the pandemic. But for Melton, that reliance on tips was “archaic,” often meaning the difference between spending more time with her children, or having to work a last-minute shift.

“I’ve missed track meets,” Melton says. “I’ve missed baseball games because I needed to work, even though I planned to be off tonight, because yesterday went so terrible.”

But Paul Sklar, a server at an Olive Garden in Baltimore, doesn’t want the tip wage system to change. He worries restaurants would have to cut hours or lay people off if they were forced to pay more to their staff out of pocket.

“If they have one slow day or one bad weekend, they’re ready to cut hours, make tough decisions with some of their most loyal people, so I can only imagine what having to pay a much higher wage would do,” Sklar says.

Paul Sklar works at an Olive Garden in Baltimore. He worries hours would be cut or layoffs would occur if restaurants had to pay more to their staff.

Courtesy of Paul Sklar


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Courtesy of Paul Sklar

Paul Sklar works at an Olive Garden in Baltimore. He worries hours would be cut or layoffs would occur if restaurants had to pay more to their staff.

Courtesy of Paul Sklar

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