Connect with us

The True Herald


Economy

SPP again asks Oklahomans to conserve energy, declares Energy Emergency Alert Level 2 – KOCO Oklahoma City

Spread the love

https://www.koco.com/article/southwest-power-pool-again-asks-oklahomans-to-conserve-energy-declares-energy-emergency-alert-level-2/35542622

Spread the love

SPP again asks Oklahomans to conserve energy, declares Energy Emergency Alert Level 2



My name is Mike Ross, senior vice president for government affairs and public relations. That Little Rock Bay Southwest power pool, uh, is many of, you know, SPP manages the electric grid and hotel electorate market plans transmission for all or part of the 14 states were one of seven regional transmission organizations designated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in the United States. Um, we appreciate your interest and your participation. Aziz, we manage this winter weather event, I would say, an unprecedented winter weather event where we’ve had, uh, temperatures below zero throughout our entire 14 state region. We’re joined today by Barbara Suck, the president and chief executive officer and also Lannie Nickel, who is the executive vice president and chief operating officer and our current status. Um, the good news is we’re in energy emergency alert Level one no coordinated temporary interruption of service Today, however, we are continuing with public appeals to conserve energy. Certainly not out of the woods yet on with that, I’ll turn to Barbara Sugg, the president CEO of Southwest Power Pool, for for some comments. Thanks, Mike. And thanks everybody that joined us today. I know it’s been a trying week for all of us and for all of you and for all of your customers and your neighbors. And, um, you know, we This has been a very unprecedented week, and I know people are tired of the word unprecedented, but it does really apply here. The temperatures, the load, the the entire situation has just been a real challenge for all of us, of course. But, you know, interrupted loads, uh, controlled outages like like we’ve had to call on these last two days, yesterday and the day before. Yeah, I mentioned this yesterday. These air, these air things that we decisions that we don’t take lightly. There’s not a single megawatt that is not important to us. There’s not a single customer or customer of our member companies that is not important to us. And so you know, certainly any type of an outage is a last ditch effort to protect the integrity of the transmission grid on to really prevent what could be a really dire situation, where where we have widespread blackouts that air uncontrolled and damaging to the system, and then it takes a lot of time thio to bring people back on it is always unfortunate, um, toe ever. You know, for any utility company ever toe have to take an outage, an intentional outage with their customers. And we haven’t We haven’t been in this boat before, and and we’re fortunate that we hadn’t been in this boat before where we had to take outages or or, uh, give orders to give to take outages within our region. Eso It’s so it’s been trying for us because we do every single thing we can do to try to prevent getting to the stage where an outage is necessary. But please know that outages that are taken are absolutely necessary to protect the grid. At that point in time when the conditions were such that too much load, it is devastating. Um, so Mike mentioned we’re still in an energy emergency alert. Level one, there are three levels. I think Lanny Lanny will probably go over that a little bit more. Um, but level one really is just, uh it is the lowest level. That’s good. The highest level is a three on that. Ultimately is where we start seeing the need essentially, anyway, that needs thio. Call for interruptions. Yeah, E for continued conservation, um, turning off some lights and maybe running the dishwasher at a different time or doing laundry at a different time. Uh, when the load is really high. I am absolutely positive that those conservation efforts helped to minimize the amount of time that we actually were in these outage situations. Um, so we also coordinate with a lot of people. And so another reason that we’ve been able to minimize these windows of outage periods long a small as we have, is through the coordination with all of our member companies, Uh, and the coordination that they have with all of you, the conservation efforts, the work that we do with the energy suppliers, the relationships that we have with the utility companies and neighboring regions outside of Southwest powerful that may have extra generation at anyone given point in time that they can that they can, you know, fill into our region. And we can import that and help to cover all of those types of coordinated events and work with our neighbors has has played a huge role in us being ableto limit these outages to the times that we have limited them. We’re not out of the woods yet. The deep freeze is still here. Um, it is still in a you know, we’re still in a situation where across our 14 state footprint, we have higher loads than we would ever have it this time of year. And, um, that that presents challenges for us that we’re still working through. I’m very proud of not just our team, but all of you. Uh, and how people have really stepped up to help, uh, in minimizing the potential outcomes. So with that, I’ll pass it back to Mike, and I’ll stick around to help answer any questions that you may have it. The end. Thank you. Thanks, Barbara. And up next is Lannie Nickel or executive Vice president and chief operating officer at at Southwest Power Pool. Lenny. Well, thank you, Mike. And you know, I don’t really want to go all the way back, Thio about a week and a half ago, when when we really began to, um, start paying attention and and preparing for this cold weather event, Um, I will I will go because a lot of you’ve already heard that, but I will go back to really Sunday morning which is when we issued our first announcement of an energy, um er emergency alert, which was a level one at the time. That’s when we begin to ask our member utilities to ask their customers to conserve energy. And those public appeals in my mind were very helpful. I believe we saw, um, almost immediate impact because by the time Monday morning rolled around, which is when we were projecting a peak of over 45,000 megawatts for wintertime conditions, we actually ended up on Lee experience in 43,000, a little over 43,000 megawatts. So almost a 2000 megawatt reduction that I believe largely can be attributed to the fact that consumers began to voluntarily reduce their usage. And, uh and that was certainly helpful to us. Um, as you recall, uh, if if you’ve been paying attention to these press conferences over the last couple of days, we did ultimately on Monday have to begin issuing directions to our utility members to, uh, start performing their emergency plans for rotating interruptions of service. Uh, that on Monday, uh, that call for for interruptions of service across the region. The 14 state region Onley amounted to about 1.5% of our regional consumption at that time. Uh, and it lasted for 50 minutes. Uh, Tuesday we began with with a little more, uh, of extreme event, because load consumption was expected to be higher that day. As you know, temperatures across the footprint continued to drop and and we were projecting even higher load for for Tuesday. And as a result of that, as well as other events occurring across the system generation not being as available as it had been on Monday, um And then, uh, imports that we have been blessed to rely upon Monday weren’t quite as great as, uh on Tuesday. And so we ended up having Thio issue directives to interrupt about 6.5% of our load on Tuesday, and that lasted about three hours and 21 minutes. Uh, these air actions we don’t want to take we’ve we’ve said that we’ll continue to remind you the these air last resort actions we’ve taken all other steps weaken. Do we? We direct all available generation that can come online to come online way, direct them to do that and purchase fuel no matter what that cost is, um, way direct and ask for assistance from our neighbors and, uh, and and we do all of that. At the same time, we’re trying to make sure that supply and demand are balanced and at the same time, while trying to make sure that transmission system infrastructure is being properly managed within safe operating limits, Um, and but at the point when demand exceeds supply, we have to correct that. We have to do it nearly immediately because if we don’t, the system will begin to automatically correct that for us. And when that happens, cascading outages occurred when a generator trips offline because it has to do that to prevent further damage that will have an impact to other generators on the system. Those generators begin to trip, and as Mawr and Mawr generators begin to trip in, an uncontrolled fashion load can no longer be served. And we had nothing we can do at that point. When that begins, toe happen. It happens in milliseconds and manual operators can. I mean, we just can’t intervene manually. Operators can’t stop that when we get to that point. So everything we’ve done has been done to protect against farm or extreme events from occurring that impact many more consumers and impact them in a much deeper MAWR impactful longer lasting way. Um, 30 minutes of our 50 minutes of outage on Monday, three hours and 21 minutes of outage on Tuesday that affected up to 6.5% of our load. Um, you know, that was that was doing everything we could do to try to continue to keep the lights on for as many people as we could in a very responsible way, as Mike mentioned today, Um, today has been much better, and we hope that that continues. Um, and and we hope that that continues through tomorrow. It it appears based on our best projections, that we could very well be in an emergency alert level to tonight again, on a level two does not mean we’re gonna shed load. It’s just simply, uh, emphasizing the need for consumers to voluntarily reduce consumption. But we could very well be there later tonight. And, uh, and throughout the night, um and then maybe early into the morning tomorrow, we do hope by the end of the day tomorrow that, uh, you know, given weather conditions and and load continuing to drop that we could very, very well be out of this situation entirely on and hope to see that by Friday We’re going to continue to do the best we can. And we’re working a zwelling we can with our members. I know they have been talking to us, Uh, just every hour, every practically every minute. We talked to them, and, uh, and our neighbors as well. And, uh, you know, without that interconnected system and network of neighbors helping each other out, this situation could have been a lot worse. And I know that’s that’s hard to hear if you’ve been affected by it. And I don’t we don’t want anybody to be affected by it. But if you have been, I know that’s hard to hear. This could have been worse, but it But it could be. I mean, that’s just the truth of the situation that could have been worse. And we’re continuing to work on. It will continue to try to make this a Z painless as possible, and and we hope to be out of it very soon.

SPP again asks Oklahomans to conserve energy, declares Energy Emergency Alert Level 2

Support Our News Campaign

Shop our Store

Click Here To Shop

The Southwest Power Pool again has asked Oklahomans to conserve electricity after declaring an Energy Emergency Alert Level 2.The increase to Level 2 went to effect at 6:20 p.m. Wednesday, hours after the Southwest Power Pool decreased it to Level 1.“We continue to urge all homes and businesses throughout our 14-state region to conserve electricity, but are not directing any interruptions of service at this time,” Southwest Power Pool officials said in a news release. “The public should follow their service providers’ directions regarding local outages, tips for conservation and safety.”As of 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, OG&E officials said there are no power outages on their system. They also said OG&E has restoration personnel ready to restore power as quickly and safely as possible to address any issues.OG&E officials also said that, per the Southwest Power Pool, temporary service interruptions remain on hold for now.”This could change at any time as extreme cold weather in the region, combined with the high demand for natural gas, continues,” OG&E officials said in a news release. “We will make every effort to communicate with customers about service interruption and estimated restoration should mandated interruptions resume.”OG&E officials said customers can help by taking conservation steps such as:Set thermostats lower than usual, if health permits.Postpone using major electric appliances such as stoves, dishwashers and clothes dryers until midday or after 9 p.m. when the demand for electricity decreases.Turn off electric lights and appliances that you do not need or are not using.Businesses should minimize the use of electric lighting and electricity-consuming equipment as much as possible.Large consumers of electricity should consider shutting down or reducing nonessential production processes.

The Southwest Power Pool again has asked Oklahomans to conserve electricity after declaring an Energy Emergency Alert Level 2.

The increase to Level 2 went to effect at 6:20 p.m. Wednesday, hours after the Southwest Power Pool decreased it to Level 1.

“We continue to urge all homes and businesses throughout our 14-state region to conserve electricity, but are not directing any interruptions of service at this time,” Southwest Power Pool officials said in a news release. “The public should follow their service providers’ directions regarding local outages, tips for conservation and safety.”

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

As of 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, OG&E officials said there are no power outages on their system. They also said OG&E has restoration personnel ready to restore power as quickly and safely as possible to address any issues.

OG&E officials also said that, per the Southwest Power Pool, temporary service interruptions remain on hold for now.

“This could change at any time as extreme cold weather in the region, combined with the high demand for natural gas, continues,” OG&E officials said in a news release. “We will make every effort to communicate with customers about service interruption and estimated restoration should mandated interruptions resume.”

OG&E officials said customers can help by taking conservation steps such as:

  • Set thermostats lower than usual, if health permits.
  • Postpone using major electric appliances such as stoves, dishwashers and clothes dryers until midday or after 9 p.m. when the demand for electricity decreases.
  • Turn off electric lights and appliances that you do not need or are not using.
  • Businesses should minimize the use of electric lighting and electricity-consuming equipment as much as possible.
  • Large consumers of electricity should consider shutting down or reducing nonessential production processes.

Subscribe to the newsletter news

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Top Stories

Trending Stories

To Top